Quality control technician

Produce

Career outlook for

Figures and forecasts for roles at the same level, which require similar skills and qualifications.

Average UK salary

Currently employed in Scotland

Six year jobs forecast

The information is supplied by LMI For All

What's it like?

You would check that products meet quality standards and are safe for customers to buy.

You would also help to set up and manage quality control systems.

You would:

  • Deal with feedback and complaints from customers
  • Refer issues to managers when needed
  • Assess suppliers
  • Check and update quality control policies
  • Train new staff
  • Write reports for quality managers.
  • Work in a team under the supervision of a quality manager

You would also have specialised tasks depending on where you work.

For example, if you worked in food and drink production, you would:

  • Find and remove faults in the production process
  • Test microbiological, chemical and physical samples
  • Check labels
  • Check that methods are in line with legislation

If you work in manufacturing engineering, you would:

  • Monitor each stage of production
  • Use statistical analysis to make sure that machined parts are within tolerance limits
  • Run tests to check for defects

You would need technical knowledge of your industry. You would also need good knowledge of quality control standards and legislation.

Working conditions

Hours

You would normally work 35 to 40 hours a week, Monday to Friday. In manufacturing, you might work on a shift rota that includes evenings and weekends.

Environment

Depending on your industry, you could be based in an office, laboratory or factory production area.

UK employment status

Full-time

Part-time

Self employed

Here are some of the skills that people in this job would be most likely to have:

  • Communicating with people
  • Working as part of a team
  • Communicating ideas through writing
  • Accuracy
  • Being logical
  • Planning and organising
  • Time management
  • Paying attention to detail

Build your skills

Your skills can help you choose the career that’s right for you. You can build your skills through work, study or activities you do in your spare time.

To understand more, have a look at what are my skills?

Keep track of your skills in your account and find the jobs, opportunities and courses that suit you.

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Getting in

Entry requirements for courses can change. Always contact the college, university or training provider to check exactly what you’ll need.

Foundation Apprenticeships

Choosing a Foundation Apprenticeship as one of your subjects in S5 and S6 can help you get a head start with this type of job.

You'll get an SCQF level 6 qualification (the same level as a Higher) plus valuable work placement experience and skills you can't learn in a classroom.

Interested? Find out what's on offer at your school on Apprenticeships.scot.

Qualifications

You would need qualifications at SCQF level 4/5.

A Higher National Diploma (HND, SCQF level 8) or degree (SCQF level 9/10) is required for some roles.

Alternatively you can start in an entry role and take relevant work-based qualifications such as a Chartered Quality Institute (CQI) Certificate in Quality Management (QCF level 3).

Useful subjects

  • English
  • Maths
  • Business management
  • Sciences, technologies or engineering subjects
  • Health & food technologies (hygiene standards)

Helpful to have

Some knowledge of quality standards and working methods will be useful when applying for jobs in quality control. You can find details of these on the British Standards Institution (BSI) website.