IT support technician

information technology (IT) support technician IT support engineer
Computing and ICT
Support

Career outlook for

Figures and forecasts for roles at the same level, which require similar skills and qualifications.

Average UK salary

Currently employed in Scotland

Jobs forecast

This information is supplied by LMI For All, where data is currently available for Scotland.

What's it like?

You would find and fix problems with people’s computers and IT equipment. You’d set up and test new equipment to make sure it works.

You would help people face to face or over the phone, email or instant messaging.

You’d need to have a wide knowledge of operating systems, software and hardware. You’d need to be able to explain the problem and the solution clearly to non-technical users.

You would:

  • Talk to people to get details of faults
  • Work out the reasons for a fault and explain it to them
  • Fix equipment, including printers and scanners (known as peripherals)
  • Set up new equipment and upgrade existing systems
  • Test and service equipment
  • Record problems and their solutions for future reference
  • Train clients on new systems or software applications

You may work for a company as part of its information technology team or provide IT support services to one or more companies.

You’d also need to be aware of health and safety regulations to guide you when setting up machines or checking equipment.

Working conditions

Hours

You would usually work 37 to 40 hours a week. Some jobs involve being on call and doing shift work, including weekends.

Environment

You would be based at an office, but may have to visit other departments within your company.

Travel

You may need to travel to external clients, or to different locations if your department supports several sites.

UK employment status

Full-time

Part-time

Self employed

Here are some of the skills that people in this job would be most likely to have:

  • Explaining things
  • Working as part of a team
  • Working on your own
  • Programming computers
  • Finding solutions to problems
  • Being logical
  • Time management

Build your skills

Your skills can help you choose the career that’s right for you. You can build your skills through work, study or activities you do in your spare time.

To understand more, have a look at what are my skills?

Keep track of your skills in your account and find the jobs, opportunities and courses that suit you.

Click here to view / add your skills

Getting in

Entry requirements for courses can change. Always contact the college, university or training provider to check exactly what you’ll need.

Qualifications

You would need qualifications at SCQF level 4/5, or a Higher National Certificate (SCQF level 7), a Higher National Diploma (SCQF level 8) or a degree (SCQF level 10) in relevant subjects such as computer engineering or electronic engineering

Or relevant work-based qualifications such as a Scottish Vocational Qualification in ICT (SVQ level 2/3/4). Most employers will require at least SCQF level 4/5 qualifications to enter a Modern Apprenticeship. There is a Modern Apprenticeship available in IT & Telecommunications (SCQF level 5 / 6). 

To enter a computer or electronic engineering Higher National Certificate (SCQF level 7) or Higher National Diploma (SCQF level 8) courses requires National 4/5 qualifications and one to two Highers (SCQF level 6) at Grade C or above. 

Entry to a degree requires National 5 qualifications and a minimum of four Highers including Maths, Physics or an IT subject. However, with suitable Advanced Highers, Higher National Certificates or Higher National Diplomas, you can gain Advanced Entry to 2nd or 3rd year of a relevant degree. 

Useful subjects

English and maths are required by most courses. Other required subjects depend on the course but may include:

  • Physics
  • Technologies subjects such as Computing science and Engineering

Helpful to have

Some employers may require you to have a driving licence.